Uganda hope Coffee-Drinking Trend Could Boost Economy


2nd September 2020

There’s a new trend brewing in Uganda amongst the younger generation that can be found in an aroma-filled cup of cappuccino or espresso. Indeed, despite being the second-largest coffee-producer on the African continent, Ugandans have been typically tea drinkers. However, Today's cultural times are seeing the rise of coffee bars in Kampala.

Over the past decade, the value of the global coffee industry has almost doubled to $90 billion. More than 2 billion cups of coffee are currently consumed worldwide each day and the market is expected to grow at an average annual rate of 5.32% between 2020 and 2024. Younger generations in particular, are driving demand for high-quality coffee, and willing to spend more money on unique and premium coffee experiences.

With global demand for coffee continuing to rise and consumers showing a thirst for coffee craftsmanship and new exquisite blends, this should be an ideal time to be a coffee farmer. However, entire communities around the world with rich histories of high-quality coffee are, in fact, struggling. Finding ways to support the growth and sale of high-quality coffees can help restore livelihoods and these regions’ economies.

According to the Uganda Coffee Development Authority, coffee exports increased by 17 percent, to 4.17 million (60 kg) bags between 2015 and 2018 and a government report from May this year showed that the value of coffee exports increased by 18 percent to 416.2 million US dollars (US) in the 2018-19 financial year.

Gerald Katabazi, Coffee Barista Extraordinaire at his shop, Volcano Coffee, explains the historical relationship Ugandanshave with the strong beverage, "Traditional coffee in Uganda was a regarded as a white man's product and also a rich man's product at the same time because of the past myth and past experiences we had from our colonists like the British Ugandan coffee consumption was at a minimum rate we are talking a minimum rate of close to 1 percent however as the corporate world is trying to get involved in each and everything influenced by the world markets and technology like that we are looking at the coffee consumption rate shifting, it is shifting from 1 percent over a decade, back now close to 6 percent which is an advantage to a coffee farmer."

In these times of global economic covid-19 upsets, Uganda, which earns huge sums from coffee exports, might do well to breathe life into its domestic market and sip on a strong cup of independent and internal coffee-bean gains.

You may also like

Zambians sue Anglo American mining company over lead poisoning

22nd October 2020

Nigeria: Lagos state governor denied fatalities from army opening fire on protestors

22nd October 2020

What you need to know about what is happening in Nigeria

21st October 2020